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Level of Educational Attainment is Important for Marriage

 

“Marriages of individuals with a higher level of educational attainment are less likely to end in divorce compared to marriages of their less educated peers”

Level of educational attainment is important for marriage

Exhibit 1-7: Sustainable marriage favors the highly educated

Exhibit 1-7: Sustainable marriage favors the highly educated

Men and women with at least a bachelor’s degree were about equally likely to marry by age 46 (90 percent and 88 percent, respectively). At all lower levels of education, women were more likely than men to marry.

Men with at least a bachelor’s degree were about 11 percentage points more likely to have married by age 46 than were men who did not complete high school. Among women, the likelihood to marry varied less by educational attainment; female college graduates were only about 4 percentage points more likely to have married than were women who did not complete high school.

For both men and women who had married, those with a bachelor’s degree were much less likely to have divorced than were men and women with less education. The differences were larger for men than for women, however. Among men who had married, those who had not completed high school were more than twice as likely to have divorced as those who had completed at least a bachelor’s degree. This difference was roughly half as large among women.

Suggested market study questions for jewelry retailers

What are the education levels in my market?

How many people (men especially) have at least a college degree in my market?

What is the ratio of single women with at least a college degree versus single men with at least a college degree?

Reason

The better educated leave school at a later age and are more likely to go on and form sustainable marriages. The accepted standard for marriage formation is that couples need to have stable jobs and be able to pay the bills for marriage to be appropriate. Those with the lowest education often can't meet this bar.

Early in the adult cycle, those who ultimately get more education are less likely to have married than their less educated counterparts. This is because those staying in school longer also delay getting married longer. But by age 40, the well educated would have caught up with the less educated and even surpassed them in the percent that have married.

Educational attainment is an important determinant of both current and long run employment potential. Career development rises rapidly during the first few years out of school for the better educated. Earnings soon rise to levels that enable them to set up households which meet socially defined minimal standards.

The pool of acceptable potential life partners decreases as women increase their education and earning status. Women prefer to marry men who have a higher earning capacity than them. College-educated women have a much greater likelihood of marrying at an older age than women of any other educational level.

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